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Pseudomyogenic Hemangioendothelioma: A Vascular Tumor Previously Undescribed in the Oral Cavity

Overview of attention for article published in Head and Neck Pathology, November 2016
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Title
Pseudomyogenic Hemangioendothelioma: A Vascular Tumor Previously Undescribed in the Oral Cavity
Published in
Head and Neck Pathology, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12105-016-0770-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yeshwant B. Rawal, Kenneth M. Anderson, Thomas B. Dodson

Abstract

The pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma (PMH) is a low-grade malignant vascular neoplasm of different tissue planes including skin and soft tissue. Primary tumors in the skeletal muscle and bone have also been diagnosed. The PMH was introduced into the WHO classification of tumors of soft tissue and bone in 2013. This is the first description of oral involvement. A 21-year-old female presented with a 2-month old swelling of her gingiva. The swelling appeared red in color and was soft in consistency. A clinical diagnosis of a pyogenic granuloma was made and an incisional biopsy was submitted for histopathological evaluation. The lesion consisted of a proliferation of spindle and epithelioid looking cells. Cells were arranged in loose fascicles and sheets. Rhabdomyoblast-like cells were also seen. No mitotic figures were present. Lesional cells were reactive to cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and CD31. Lesional cell reactivity to S100 protein, HMB 45, SMA, Desmin and CD34 was negative. Following the diagnosis, a wide excision for clear margins was performed. No recurrence has been reported 2 years since the removal. The PMH is a cutaneous tumor that behaves in an indolent fashion. This is the first report of oral involvement by this neoplasm. Recognition of its histopathological features and immunohistochemical reactivity will prevent misadventures in the diagnosis of oral lesions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 20%
Professor 1 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Student > Postgraduate 1 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 20%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 80%
Unspecified 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,296,196
of 12,104,225 outputs
Outputs from Head and Neck Pathology
#328
of 432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,052
of 285,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Head and Neck Pathology
#12
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,104,225 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 432 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.