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Autistic disorder and viral infections

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroVirology, February 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 656)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
150 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
141 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Autistic disorder and viral infections
Published in
Journal of NeuroVirology, February 2005
DOI 10.1080/13550280590900553
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Libbey, Thayne Sweeten, William McMahon, Robert Fujinami

Abstract

Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 4%
Mexico 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 132 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 19%
Researcher 22 16%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 12%
Student > Master 17 12%
Other 39 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 30%
Unspecified 26 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 17%
Psychology 14 10%
Neuroscience 13 9%
Other 21 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2019.
All research outputs
#910,094
of 13,594,282 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroVirology
#13
of 656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,530
of 232,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroVirology
#1
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,594,282 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 656 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,730 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.