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Myopia prevention, near work, and visual acuity of college students: integrating the theory of planned behavior and self-determination theory

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Behavioral Medicine, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
Title
Myopia prevention, near work, and visual acuity of college students: integrating the theory of planned behavior and self-determination theory
Published in
Journal of Behavioral Medicine, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10865-013-9494-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Derwin King-Chung Chan, Ying-Ki Fung, Suxuan Xing, Martin S. Hagger

Abstract

There has been little research examining the psychological antecedents of safety-oriented behavior aimed at reducing myopia risk. This study utilizes self-determination theory (SDT) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to understand the role of motivational and social-cognitive factors on individuals' near-work behavior. Adopting a prospective design, undergraduate students (n = 107) completed an initial questionnaire based on SDT in week 1, a second questionnaire containing measures of TPB variables in week 2, and objective measures of reading distance and visual acuity in week 6. The data were analyzed by variance-based structural equation modeling. The results showed that perceived autonomy support and autonomous motivation from SDT significantly predicted attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control from the TPB. These social-cognitive factors were significantly associated with intention and intention significantly predicted reading distance. The relationships in the model held when controlling for visual acuity. In conclusion, the integrated model of SDT and the TPB may help explain myopia-preventive behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 2 3%
Italy 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 68 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 12%
Researcher 6 8%
Other 19 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 32%
Social Sciences 11 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 14%
Unspecified 7 9%
Sports and Recreations 5 7%
Other 17 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2015.
All research outputs
#6,647,398
of 12,316,253 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#464
of 736 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,120
of 227,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 736 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,729 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.