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Mercury contamination, a potential threat to the globally endangered aquatic warbler Acrocephalus paludicola

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, September 2017
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14 Mendeley
Title
Mercury contamination, a potential threat to the globally endangered aquatic warbler Acrocephalus paludicola
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, September 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-0201-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aneta Dorota Pacyna, Carlos Zumalacárregui Martínez, David Miguélez, Frédéric Jiguet, Żaneta Polkowska, Katarzyna Wojczulanis-Jakubas

Abstract

Mercury (Hg) contamination is considered a global concern for humans and wildlife, and although the number of studies dealing with that issue continues to increase, some taxonomic groups such as small passerine birds are largely understudied. In this paper, concentration of mercury in the aquatic warbler (Acrocephalus paludicola) feathers, a globally threatened passerine species, was examined. The concentration differences between two ages and sexes were investigated. The comparison of feathers taken on autumn migrants of two age categories act as a comparison of the species' exposure within the two different areas (European breeding or African wintering grounds). The average Hg concentration for all sampled individuals [2.32 μg/g dw (range 0.38-12.76)] is relatively high, compared with values found in other passerine species. An age difference was found, with first-year individuals displaying higher mercury concentrations than adults. This indicates that birds are exposed to mercury pollution during the breeding season, i.e., in the continental floodplains of eastern Europe. The average Hg concentration in feathers grown on the breeding grounds was 3.88 ± 2.59 μg/g dw, closer to the critical value of 5 μg/g dw, which is considered to impair the health of individuals. The findings suggest that mercury pollution may constitute a threat so far neglected for the endangered aquatic warbler.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 36%
Unspecified 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 29%
Unspecified 3 21%
Mathematics 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,640,254
of 12,050,803 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,534
of 3,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,839
of 284,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#111
of 238 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,050,803 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,116 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,725 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 238 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.