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The effect of physical activity on fatigue among survivors of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, October 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
The effect of physical activity on fatigue among survivors of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, October 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3920-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Brandenbarg, J. H. W. M. Korsten, M. Y. Berger, A. J. Berendsen

Abstract

Favorable health outcomes among cancer survivors are increasingly being attributed to lifestyle factors like physical activity, which is now promoted in clinical guidelines. However, the available evidence indicates that physical activity may also reduce fatigue in this patient group. In this systematic review, we aimed to examine whether physical activity could reduce fatigue among survivors of colorectal cancer. The databases of Medline, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were systematically searched, using combinations of MeSH and free-text terms for colorectal cancer, physical activity, and fatigue. Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies with longitudinal data collection were included. We performed a random-effect meta-analysis. Seven studies were included, five were randomized controlled trials, and two were cohort studies. A meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials, which comprised 630 survivors in total, failed to show that physical activity had a significant effect on fatigue (standardized mean difference = 0.21 (- 0.07 to 0.49)); however, reduced levels of fatigue were observed in all studies. The results for the cohort studies were inconclusive: one showed that increasing levels of physical activity were significantly associated with decreasing levels of fatigue; the other showed that decreasing levels of fatigue were not associated with increasing levels of physical activity. Based on the data reviewed, we cannot draw definitive conclusions about the effects of physical activity on fatigue. None of the included studies were performed among fatigued survivors of colorectal cancer. More research is needed in this population, ensuring that the trials are appropriately powered to find differences in fatigue.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 27%
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 20%
Sports and Recreations 4 13%
Engineering 2 7%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,388,964
of 12,352,780 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,211
of 2,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,052
of 293,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#53
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,780 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,891 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.