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Post-stroke depression and lesion location: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurology, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

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101 Mendeley
Title
Post-stroke depression and lesion location: a systematic review
Published in
Journal of Neurology, October 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00415-014-7534-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Na Wei, Wu Yong, Xinyan Li, Yafan Zhou, Manfei Deng, Houze Zhu, Huijuan Jin

Abstract

Post-stroke depression (PSD) is a frequent problem in stroke rehabilitation. Several studies have evaluated association between the lesion location and the risk of depression. Different conclusions and contradictory findings have been published. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between PSD and lesion location. We researched PubMed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, and systematically reviewed available publications reporting investigations on stroke location and risk of PSD. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the time since stroke onset to assessment for PSD or the source of patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used for pooled analyses. Heterogeneity was assessed with Cochran's Q test and I (2) test. Begg's funnel plot and Egger's test were used to examine the publication bias. A total of 43 studies involving 5,507 patients suffering from stroke were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled OR with 95 % CI for the overall association of stroke location and depression risk was 0.99 (0.88-1.11). Subgroups analyses highlighted that only studies with subacute post-stroke group (1-6 months) showed a statistical association between right hemisphere stroke and risk of depression (OR = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.66-0.93). This systematic review offered no support for the hypothesis that lesion of the left hemisphere was associated with an increased risk of depression after stroke. We only find significant association between right hemisphere stroke and incidence of depression for studies within subacute post-stroke phase.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Unknown 99 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 24%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Unspecified 10 10%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Other 33 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 39%
Psychology 17 17%
Unspecified 14 14%
Neuroscience 11 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Other 13 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2015.
All research outputs
#1,013,210
of 12,539,270 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurology
#101
of 2,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,838
of 213,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurology
#7
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,539,270 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,365 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,049 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.