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Comparative transcriptome analysis of Apis mellifera antennae of workers performing different tasks

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Genetics & Genomics, October 2017
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Title
Comparative transcriptome analysis of Apis mellifera antennae of workers performing different tasks
Published in
Molecular Genetics & Genomics, October 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00438-017-1382-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hongyi Nie, Shupeng Xu, Cuiqin Xie, Haiyang Geng, Yazhou Zhao, Jianghong Li, Wei-fone Huang, Yan Lin, Zhiguo Li, Songkun Su

Abstract

Honey bee is a social insect. Its colony is mainly coordinated by the chemical signals such as pheromones produced by queen or brood. Correspondingly, the worker bee developed numerous complicated olfactory sensilla in antennae for detection of these colony chemical signals and nectar/pollen signals in foraging. With the normal development of new emerged workers, young adults (nurse bee) worked in colony at the first 2-3 weeks and then followed by the foraging activity outside of the hive, which give rise to great change of the surrounding chemical signals. However, the olfactory adaption mechanism of worker bee in these processes of behavioral development is still unclear. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of gene expression in Apis mellifera antenna of newly emerged workers, nurses and foragers using transcriptome analysis. Meanwhile, we constructed experimental colonies to collect age-matched samples, which were used to determine whether task is the principal determinant of differential expression. RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that 6 and 14 genes were closely associated with nurse and forager behaviors, respectively. Furthermore, a broad dynamic range of chemosensory gene families and candidate odorant degrading enzymes were analyzed at different behavior statuses. We firstly reported genes associated with nursing/foraging behavior from antennae and the variations of expression of genes belonging to various olfactory gene families at different development stages. These results not only could contribute to elucidating the relationship between olfactory and behavior-related changes, but also provide a new perspective into the molecular mechanism underlying honey bee division of labor.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 31%
Unspecified 3 23%
Student > Master 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 46%
Unspecified 4 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,656,845
of 12,016,495 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#799
of 902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,237
of 283,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#22
of 30 outputs
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