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Can the gastrointestinal microbiota be modulated by dietary fibre to treat obesity?

Overview of attention for article published in Irish Journal of Medical Science, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 729)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
Title
Can the gastrointestinal microbiota be modulated by dietary fibre to treat obesity?
Published in
Irish Journal of Medical Science, October 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11845-017-1686-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

H. C. Davis

Abstract

Recent research suggests that the human gastrointestinal microbiota is greatly involved in yielding, storing and expending energy from the diet; therefore, it may be a further factor in linking diet to obesity. The gut microbial composition is affected by diet throughout the human lifespan, and is highly dynamic and efficient in response to dietary alterations in particular to dietary fibre intake. Short-chained fatty acids (SCFA) are the bi-product of fibre fermentation and have both obesogenic and anti-obesogenic properties. The production of specific forms of SCFAs depends on the microbes available in the gut and the type of fibre ingested. The gut microbiome associated with healthy lean individuals has a higher microbial biodiversity and a greater Bacteroidete to Firmicute ratio compared to the obese individuals associated with microbiome. These gut microbial associations are similar to those seen in individuals with high and low dietary fibre intakes, respectively. Metabolites generated by Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes include the three main SCFA related to obesity, namely butyrate, acetate and propionate. However, neither Bacteroidetes nor Firmicutes is purely causative or purely preventative of obesity. More research is crucial in linking the various types of fibre with particular SCFA production and the microbiome it promotes before suggesting that dietary fibre modulation of the gut microbiome can treat obesity. However, the long-term dietary trend plays the principal role in assembling the diversity and abundance of gut microbes; thus, a sustained diet high in fibre may help prevent obesity by promoting a microbiome associated with a lean phenotype.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 31%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 20%
Unspecified 7 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Other 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,059,645
of 13,606,339 outputs
Outputs from Irish Journal of Medical Science
#21
of 729 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,270
of 314,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Irish Journal of Medical Science
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,606,339 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 729 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.