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Congenital pulmonary airway malformations: state-of-the-art review for pediatrician’s use

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
Title
Congenital pulmonary airway malformations: state-of-the-art review for pediatrician’s use
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, October 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00431-017-3032-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire Leblanc, Marguerite Baron, Emilie Desselas, Minh Hanh Phan, Alexis Rybak, Guillaume Thouvenin, Clara Lauby, Sabine Irtan

Abstract

Congenital pulmonary airway malformations or CPAM are rare developmental lung malformations, leading to cystic and/or adenomatous pulmonary areas. Nowadays, CPAM are diagnosed prenatally, improving the prenatal and immediate postnatal care and ultimately the knowledge on CPAM pathophysiology. CPAM natural evolution can lead to infections or malignancies, whose exact prevalence is still difficult to assess. The aim of this "state-of-the-art" review is to cover the recently published literature on CPAM management whether the pulmonary lesion was detected during pregnancy or after birth, the current indications of surgery or surveillance and finally its potential evolution to pleuro-pulmonary blastoma. Surgery remains the cornerstone treatment of symptomatic lesions but the postnatal management of asymptomatic CPAM remains controversial. There are pros and cons of surgical resection, as increasing rate of infections over time renders the surgery more difficult after months or years of evolution, as well as risk of malignancy, though exact incidence is still unknown. What is known: • Congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM) are rare developmental lung malformations mainly antenatally diagnosed. • While the neonatal management of symptomatic CPAM is clear and includes prompt surgery, controversies remain for asymptomatic CPAM due to risk of infections and malignancies. What is new: • Increased rate of infection over time renders the surgery more difficult after months or years of evolution and pushes for recommendation of early elective surgery. • New molecular or pathological pathways may help in the distinction of type 4 CPAM from type I pleuropulmonary blastoma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 24%
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Other 2 12%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 65%
Unspecified 5 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,909,645
of 12,834,493 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#293
of 2,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,236
of 313,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#3
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,834,493 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,263 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.