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Open-circuit respirometry: a historical review of portable gas analysis systems

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, October 2017
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50 Mendeley
Title
Open-circuit respirometry: a historical review of portable gas analysis systems
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, October 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00421-017-3716-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duncan J. Macfarlane

Abstract

Scientists such as physiologists, engineers, and nutritionists have often sought to estimate human metabolic strain during daily activities and physical pursuits. The measurement of human metabolism can involve direct calorimetry as well as indirect calorimetry using both closed-circuit respirometry and open-circuit methods that can include diluted flow chambers and laboratory-based gas analysis systems. For field studies, methods involving questionnaires, pedometry, accelerometery, heart rate telemetry, and doubly labelled water exist, yet portable metabolic gas analysis remains the gold standard for most field studies on energy expenditure. This review focuses on research-based portable systems designed to estimate metabolic rate typically under steady-state conditions by critically examining each significant historical innovation. Key developments include Zuntz's 1906 innovative system, then a significant improvement to this purely mechanical system by the widely adopted Kofranyi-Michaelis device in the 1940s. Later, a series of technical improvements: in electronics lead to Wolf's Integrating Motor Pneumotachograph in the 1950s; in polarographic O2 cells in 1970-1980's allowed on-line oxygen uptake measures; in CO2 cells in 1990s allowed on-line respiratory exchange ratio determination; and in advanced sensors/computing power at the turn of the century led to the first truly breath-by-breath portable systems. Very recent significant updates to the popular Cosmed and Cortex systems and the potential commercial release of the NASA-developed 'PUMA' system show that technological developments in this niche area are still incrementally advancing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Student > Master 9 18%
Unspecified 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Other 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 22%
Unspecified 9 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Engineering 3 6%
Other 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,263,230
of 12,099,480 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#1,949
of 2,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,041
of 285,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#40
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,099,480 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,754 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,150 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.