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Exercise preferences and associations between fitness parameters, physical activity, and quality of life in high-grade glioma patients

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, December 2016
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Title
Exercise preferences and associations between fitness parameters, physical activity, and quality of life in high-grade glioma patients
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3516-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Nicole Culos-Reed, Heather J. Leach, Lauren C. Capozzi, Jacob Easaw, Neil Eves, Guillaume Y. Millet

Abstract

Exercise has numerous benefits for cancer survivors, but very limited research to date has exclusively examined brain cancer patients, specifically those diagnosed with high-grade glioma (HGG). This study examined (1) the feasibility of recruiting HGG patients to an exercise-based study and performing fitness assessments; (2) exercise counseling and programming preferences; and (3) associations between fitness, physical activity (PA), and quality of life (QOL). Participants completed assessments prior to starting Temozolamide chemotherapy with radiation (T1), at 2 months and 8 months. Fitness was measured with an incremental cycling exercise test to volitional exhaustion (VO2peak) and hand grip dynamometry. The Godin leisure time questionnaire measured PA and the functional assessment for cancer therapy, brain cancer module (FACT-Br) measured QOL. Of the 35 approached, N = 16 participated. Due to safety concerns, the aerobic fitness test protocol was altered. Participants preferred to exercise during treatment, alone and unsupervised, at home, and at a moderate intensity. Few participants (<25%) met guidelines for PA at any time point. At T1, aerobic capacity was associated with the FACT Trial Outcome Index (TOI) (r = 0.619, p < 0.05). At 2 months, PA minutes were associated with FACT-TOI (r = 0.653, p = 0.057), FACT-G (r = 0.711, p < 0.05), and FACT-Br scores (r = 0.722, p < 0.05). Recruitment rate was similar to a previous study in HGG populations, but study completion rate was lower. Most exercise counseling and programming preferences were similar to previous brain cancer patients. Assessing aerobic fitness to VO2peak was not feasible. Aerobic fitness and PA were positively associated with QOL.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 31%
Student > Master 6 23%
Researcher 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 10 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 19%
Sports and Recreations 2 8%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,595,015
of 11,991,714 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,781
of 2,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,967
of 275,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#64
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,991,714 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,303 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.