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Subcortical Neural Synchrony and Absolute Thresholds Predict Frequency Discrimination Independently

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO, June 2013
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Title
Subcortical Neural Synchrony and Absolute Thresholds Predict Frequency Discrimination Independently
Published in
Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO, June 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10162-013-0402-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

F. Marmel, D. Linley, R. P. Carlyon, H. E. Gockel, K. Hopkins, C. J. Plack

Abstract

The neural mechanisms of pitch coding have been debated for more than a century. The two main mechanisms are coding based on the profiles of neural firing rates across auditory nerve fibers with different characteristic frequencies (place-rate coding), and coding based on the phase-locked temporal pattern of neural firing (temporal coding). Phase locking precision can be partly assessed by recording the frequency-following response (FFR), a scalp-recorded electrophysiological response that reflects synchronous activity in subcortical neurons. Although features of the FFR have been widely used as indices of pitch coding acuity, only a handful of studies have directly investigated the relation between the FFR and behavioral pitch judgments. Furthermore, the contribution of degraded neural synchrony (as indexed by the FFR) to the pitch perception impairments of older listeners and those with hearing loss is not well known. Here, the relation between the FFR and pure-tone frequency discrimination was investigated in listeners with a wide range of ages and absolute thresholds, to assess the respective contributions of subcortical neural synchrony and other age-related and hearing loss-related mechanisms to frequency discrimination performance. FFR measures of neural synchrony and absolute thresholds independently contributed to frequency discrimination performance. Age alone, i.e., once the effect of subcortical neural synchrony measures or absolute thresholds had been partialed out, did not contribute to frequency discrimination. Overall, the results suggest that frequency discrimination of pure tones may depend both on phase locking precision and on separate mechanisms affected in hearing loss.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
United States 1 1%
Ghana 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 69 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Researcher 18 24%
Other 7 9%
Student > Master 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 24%
Neuroscience 14 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 16%
Unspecified 9 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Other 15 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2014.
All research outputs
#10,538,586
of 13,231,346 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO
#193
of 270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,826
of 211,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO
#4
of 6 outputs
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