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Y-SNP L1034: limited genetic link between Mansi and Hungarian-speaking populations

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Genetics & Genomics, September 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 1,079)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

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1 blog
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1 tweeter
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
Title
Y-SNP L1034: limited genetic link between Mansi and Hungarian-speaking populations
Published in
Molecular Genetics & Genomics, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00438-014-0925-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. Fehér, E. Németh, A. Vándor, I. V. Kornienko, L. K. Csáji, H. Pamjav

Abstract

Genetic studies noted that the Hungarian Y-chromosomal gene pool significantly differs from other Uralic-speaking populations. Hungarians show very limited or no presence of haplogroup N-Tat, which is frequent among other Uralic-speaking populations. We proposed that some genetic links need to be observed between the linguistically related Hungarian and Mansi populations.This is the first attempt to divide haplogroup N-Tat into subhaplogroups by testing new downstream SNP markers L708 and L1034. Sixty Northern Mansi samples were collected in Western Siberia and genotyped for Y-chromosomal haplotypes and haplogroups. We found 14 Mansi and 92 N-Tat samples from 7 populations. Comparative results showed that all N-Tat samples carried the N-L708 mutation. Some Hungarian, Sekler, and Uzbek samples were L1034 SNP positive, while all Mongolians, Buryats, Khanty, Finnish, and Roma samples yielded a negative result for this marker. Based on the above, L1034 marker seems to be a subgroup of N-Tat, which is typical for Mansi and Hungarian-speaking ethnic groups so far. Based on our time to most recent common ancestor data, the L1034 marker arose 2,500 years before present. The overall frequency of the L1034 is very low among the analyzed populations, thus it does not necessarily mean that proto-Hungarians and Mansi descend from common ancestors. It does provide, however, a limited genetic link supporting language contact. Both Hungarians and Mansi have much more complex genetic population history than the traditional tree-based linguistic model would suggest.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 69%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Linguistics 1 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2018.
All research outputs
#1,131,140
of 13,093,074 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#14
of 1,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,307
of 211,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Genetics & Genomics
#1
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,093,074 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,079 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,342 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.