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The effective elastic properties of human trabecular bone may be approximated using micro-finite element analyses of embedded volume elements

Overview of attention for article published in Biomechanics & Modeling in Mechanobiology, October 2016
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Title
The effective elastic properties of human trabecular bone may be approximated using micro-finite element analyses of embedded volume elements
Published in
Biomechanics & Modeling in Mechanobiology, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10237-016-0849-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karol Daszkiewicz, Ghislain Maquer, Philippe K. Zysset

Abstract

Boundary conditions (BCs) and sample size affect the measured elastic properties of cancellous bone. Samples too small to be representative appear stiffer under kinematic uniform BCs (KUBCs) than under periodicity-compatible mixed uniform BCs (PMUBCs). To avoid those effects, we propose to determine the effective properties of trabecular bone using an embedded configuration. Cubic samples of various sizes (2.63, 5.29, 7.96, 10.58 and 15.87 mm) were cropped from [Formula: see text] scans of femoral heads and vertebral bodies. They were converted into [Formula: see text] models and their stiffness tensor was established via six uniaxial and shear load cases. PMUBCs- and KUBCs-based tensors were determined for each sample. "In situ" stiffness tensors were also evaluated for the embedded configuration, i.e. when the loads were transmitted to the samples via a layer of trabecular bone. The Zysset-Curnier model accounting for bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy was fitted to those stiffness tensors, and model parameters [Formula: see text] (Poisson's ratio) [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] (elastic and shear moduli) were compared between sizes. BCs and sample size had little impact on [Formula: see text]. However, KUBCs- and PMUBCs-based [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, decreased and increased with growing size, though convergence was not reached even for our largest samples. Both BCs produced upper and lower bounds for the in situ values that were almost constant across samples dimensions, thus appearing as an approximation of the effective properties. PMUBCs seem also appropriate for mimicking the trabecular core, but they still underestimate its elastic properties (especially in shear) even for nearly orthotropic samples.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Student > Master 5 26%
Unspecified 4 21%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 8 42%
Unspecified 7 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Materials Science 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,399,278
of 11,880,222 outputs
Outputs from Biomechanics & Modeling in Mechanobiology
#115
of 206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,085
of 273,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biomechanics & Modeling in Mechanobiology
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,880,222 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.