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Communication between mast cells and rat submucosal neurons

Overview of attention for article published in Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology, September 2014
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Title
Communication between mast cells and rat submucosal neurons
Published in
Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00424-014-1609-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Bell, Mike Althaus, Martin Diener

Abstract

Histamine is a mast cell mediator released e.g. during food allergy. The aim of the project was to identify the effect of histamine on rat submucosal neurons and the mechanisms involved. Cultured submucosal neurons from rat colon express H1, H2 and H3 receptors as shown by immunocytochemical staining confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with messenger RNA (mRNA) isolated from submucosal homogenates as starting material. Histamine evoked a biphasic rise of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in cultured submucosal neurons, consisting in a release of intracellularly stored Ca(2+) followed by an influx from the extracellular space. Although agonists of all three receptor subtypes evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, experiments with antagonists revealed that mainly H1 (and to a lesser degree H2) receptors mediate the response to histamine. In coculture experiments with RBL-2H3 cells, a mast cell equivalent, compound 48/80, evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration of neighbouring neurons. Like the response to native histamine, the neuronal response to the mast cell degranulator was strongly inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine and reduced by the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine. In rats sensitized against ovalbumin, exposure to the antigen induced a rise in short-circuit current (I sc) across colonic mucosa-submucosa preparations without a significant increase in paracellular fluorescein fluxes. Pyrilamine strongly inhibited the increase in I sc, a weaker inhibition was observed after blockade of protease receptors or 5-lipoxygenase. Consequently, H1 receptors on submucosal neurons seem to play a pivotal role in the communication between mast cells and the enteric nervous system.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 11%
Unknown 8 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 33%
Unspecified 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Professor 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 33%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2014.
All research outputs
#10,830,700
of 12,216,894 outputs
Outputs from Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
#1,078
of 1,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,499
of 218,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
#27
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,216,894 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,204 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,596 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.