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Sex differences in parking are affected by biological and social factors

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Research, December 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 682)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Sex differences in parking are affected by biological and social factors
Published in
Psychological Research, December 2009
DOI 10.1007/s00426-009-0267-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia C. Wolf, Sebastian Ocklenburg, Beyza Ören, Cordula Becker, Andrea Hofstätter, Christa Bös, Markus Popken, Truls Thorstensen, Onur Güntürkün

Abstract

The stereotype of women's limited parking skills is deeply anchored in modern culture. Although laboratory tests prove men's average superiority in visuospatial tasks and parking requires complex, spatial skills, underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. Here, we investigated performance of beginners (nine women, eight men) and more experienced drivers (21 women, 27 men) at different parking manoeuvres. Furthermore, subjects conducted the mental rotation test and self-assessed their parking skills. We show that men park more accurately and especially faster than women. Performance is related to mental rotation skills and self-assessment in beginners, but only to self-assessment in more experienced drivers. We assume that, due to differential feedback, self-assessment incrementally replaces the controlling influence of mental rotation, as parking is trained with increasing experience. Results suggest that sex differences in spatial cognition persist in real-life situations, but that socio-psychological factors modulate the biological causes of sex differences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 7%
Chile 2 5%
Switzerland 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 36 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Engineering 2 5%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2019.
All research outputs
#985,998
of 14,262,710 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Research
#39
of 682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,605
of 208,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Research
#3
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,262,710 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.