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Are rates of pediatric bipolar disorder increasing? Results from a nationwide register study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
Title
Are rates of pediatric bipolar disorder increasing? Results from a nationwide register study
Published in
International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s40345-014-0010-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lars Vedel Kessing, Eleni Vradi, Per Kragh Andersen

Abstract

Studies from the USA suggest that rates of pediatric bipolar disorder have increased since the mid-90s, but no study outside the USA has been published on the rates of pediatric bipolar disorder. Further, it is unclear whether an increase in rates reflects a true increase in the illness or more diagnostic attention. Using nationwide registers of all inpatients and outpatients contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark, we investigated (1) gender-specific rates of incident pediatric mania/bipolar disorder during a period from 1995 to 2012, (2) whether age and other characteristics for pediatric mania/bipolar disorder changed during the calendar period (1995 to 2003 versus 2004 to 2012), and (3) whether the diagnosis is more often made at first psychiatric contact in recent time compared to earlier according to gender. Totally, 346 patients got a main diagnosis of a manic episode (F30) or bipolar affective disorder (F31) at least once during the study period from 1995 to 2012. For both sexes, annual rates of mania/bipolar disorder two to four doubled during the study period (0.001% before year 2004 to 0.002%-0.004% in 2010). Median age at the index diagnosis was very similar during the two calendar periods (17.2, quartiles, 16.2-18.3 versus 17.4, quartiles, 16.1-18.2) indicating that the diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder was not made earlier in the recent calendar period. Similarly, there were no differences between early versus late in the study period in the fractions of first contact diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder diagnoses, the contact number at which patients got the diagnosis or the duration from first psychiatric contact to the diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder. The rate of diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder increased from 1995 to 2014, which did not seem to be explained by more diagnostic attention.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Brazil 1 5%
Unknown 18 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Student > Bachelor 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Computer Science 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2014.
All research outputs
#8,679,337
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Bipolar Disorders
#132
of 194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,531
of 208,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Bipolar Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 194 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,009 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them