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Direct evidence of trophic interactions among apex predators in the Late Triassic of western North America

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 1,420)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
Direct evidence of trophic interactions among apex predators in the Late Triassic of western North America
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00114-014-1238-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie K. Drumheller, Michelle R. Stocker, Sterling J. Nesbitt

Abstract

Hypotheses of feeding behaviors and community structure are testable with rare direct evidence of trophic interactions in the fossil record (e.g., bite marks). We present evidence of four predation, scavenging, and/or interspecific fighting events involving two large paracrocodylomorphs (='rauisuchians') from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation (∼220-210 Ma). The larger femur preserves a rare history of interactions with multiple actors prior to and after death of this ∼8-9-m individual. A large embedded tooth crown and punctures, all of which display reaction tissue formed through healing, record evidence of a failed attack on this individual. The second paracrocodylomorph femur exhibits four unhealed bite marks, indicating the animal either did not survive the attack or was scavenged soon after death. The combination of character states observed (e.g., morphology of the embedded tooth, 'D'-shaped punctures, evidence of bicarination of the marking teeth, spacing of potentially serial marks) indicates that large phytosaurs were actors in both cases. Our analysis of these specimens demonstrates phytosaurs targeted large paracrocodylomorphs in these Late Triassic ecosystems. Previous distinctions between 'aquatic' and 'terrestrial' Late Triassic trophic structures were overly simplistic and built upon mistaken paleoecological assumptions; we show they were intimately connected at the highest trophic levels. Our data also support that size cannot be the sole factor in determining trophic status. Furthermore, these marks provide an opportunity to start exploring the seemingly unbalanced terrestrial ecosystems from the Late Triassic of North America, in which large carnivores far outnumber herbivores in terms of both abundance and diversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 29%
Researcher 4 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 29%
Unspecified 3 14%
Environmental Science 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 132. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2017.
All research outputs
#97,343
of 12,462,651 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#16
of 1,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,615
of 176,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#2
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,462,651 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,420 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.