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The influence of race/ethnicity and place of service on breast reconstruction for Medicare beneficiaries with mastectomy

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#32 of 1,852)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
The influence of race/ethnicity and place of service on breast reconstruction for Medicare beneficiaries with mastectomy
Published in
SpringerPlus, August 2014
DOI 10.1186/2193-1801-3-416
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tracy Onega, Julie Weiss, Karla Kerlikowske, Karen Wernli, Diana SM Buist, Louise M Henderson, Martha Goodrich, Jennifer Alford-Teaster, Beth Virnig, Anna NA Tosteson, Wendy DeMartini, Rebecca Hubbard

Abstract

Racial disparities in breast reconstruction for breast cancer are documented. Place of service has contributed to disparities in cancer care; but the interaction of race/ethnicity and place of service has not been explicitly examined. We examined whether place of service modified the effect of race/ethnicity on receipt of reconstruction. We included women with a mastectomy for incident breast cancer in SEER-Medicare from 2005-2009. Using Medicare claims, we determined breast reconstruction within 6 months. Facility characteristics included: rural/urban location, teaching status, NCI Cancer Center designation, cooperative oncology group membership, Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) status, and breast surgery volume. Using multivariable logistic regression, we analyzed reconstruction in relation to minority status and facility characteristics. Of the 17,958 women, 14.2% were racial/ethnic women of color and a total of 9.3% had reconstruction. Caucasians disproportionately received care at non-teaching hospitals (53% v. 42%) and did not at Disproportionate Share Hospitals (77% v. 86%). Women of color had 55% lower odds of reconstruction than Caucasians (OR = 0.45; 95% CI 0.37-0.55). Those in lower median income areas had lower odds of receiving reconstruction, regardless of race/ethnicity. Odds of reconstruction reduced at rural, non-teaching and cooperative oncology group hospitals, and lower surgery volume facilities. Facility effects on odds of reconstruction were similar in analyses stratified by race/ethnicity status. Race/ethnicity and facility characteristics have independent effects on utilization of breast reconstruction, with no significant interaction. This suggests that, regardless of a woman's race/ethnicity, the place of service influences the likelihood of reconstruction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 17%
Student > Postgraduate 4 17%
Other 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 48%
Social Sciences 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2014.
All research outputs
#806,339
of 22,763,032 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#32
of 1,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,616
of 230,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#2
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,763,032 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,852 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,512 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.