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Social learning by imitation in a reptile (Pogona vitticeps)

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 977)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
153 Mendeley
Title
Social learning by imitation in a reptile (Pogona vitticeps)
Published in
Animal Cognition, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10071-014-0803-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Kis, Ludwig Huber, Anna Wilkinson

Abstract

The ability to learn through imitation is thought to be the basis of cultural transmission and was long considered a distinctive characteristic of humans. There is now evidence that both mammals and birds are capable of imitation. However, nothing is known about these abilities in the third amniotic class-reptiles. Here, we use a bidirectional control procedure to show that a reptile species, the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), is capable of social learning that cannot be explained by simple mechanisms such as local enhancement or goal emulation. Subjects in the experimental group opened a trap door to the side that had been demonstrated, while subjects in the ghost control group, who observed the door move without the intervention of a conspecific, were unsuccessful. This, together with differences in behaviour between experimental and control groups, provides compelling evidence that reptiles possess cognitive abilities that are comparable to those observed in mammals and birds and suggests that learning by imitation is likely to be based on ancient mechanisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 153 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 1%
Hungary 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Unknown 144 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 24%
Student > Master 28 18%
Researcher 26 17%
Student > Bachelor 25 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 83 54%
Psychology 33 22%
Unspecified 11 7%
Neuroscience 7 5%
Environmental Science 5 3%
Other 14 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 151. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2019.
All research outputs
#92,320
of 13,261,910 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#37
of 977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,554
of 201,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,261,910 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.