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Correction of β-thalassemia mutant by base editor in human embryos

Overview of attention for article published in Protein & Cell, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 438)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
41 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
220 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
73 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
276 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Correction of β-thalassemia mutant by base editor in human embryos
Published in
Protein & Cell, September 2017
DOI 10.1007/s13238-017-0475-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Puping Liang, Chenhui Ding, Hongwei Sun, Xiaowei Xie, Yanwen Xu, Xiya Zhang, Ying Sun, Yuanyan Xiong, Wenbin Ma, Yongxiang Liu, Yali Wang, Jianpei Fang, Dan Liu, Zhou Songyang, Canquan Zhou, Junjiu Huang

Abstract

β-Thalassemia is a global health issue, caused by mutations in the HBB gene. Among these mutations, HBB -28 (A>G) mutations is one of the three most common mutations in China and Southeast Asia patients with β-thalassemia. Correcting this mutation in human embryos may prevent the disease being passed onto future generations and cure anemia. Here we report the first study using base editor (BE) system to correct disease mutant in human embryos. Firstly, we produced a 293T cell line with an exogenous HBB -28 (A>G) mutant fragment for gRNAs and targeting efficiency evaluation. Then we collected primary skin fibroblast cells from a β-thalassemia patient with HBB -28 (A>G) homozygous mutation. Data showed that base editor could precisely correct HBB -28 (A>G) mutation in the patient's primary cells. To model homozygous mutation disease embryos, we constructed nuclear transfer embryos by fusing the lymphocyte or skin fibroblast cells with enucleated in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. Notably, the gene correction efficiency was over 23.0% in these embryos by base editor. Although these embryos were still mosaic, the percentage of repaired blastomeres was over 20.0%. In addition, we found that base editor variants, with narrowed deamination window, could promote G-to-A conversion at HBB -28 site precisely in human embryos. Collectively, this study demonstrated the feasibility of curing genetic disease in human somatic cells and embryos by base editor system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 220 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 276 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 276 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 113 41%
Unspecified 33 12%
Researcher 33 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 12%
Student > Master 25 9%
Other 39 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 115 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 19%
Unspecified 40 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 9%
Chemistry 11 4%
Other 31 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 521. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2018.
All research outputs
#15,490
of 13,644,074 outputs
Outputs from Protein & Cell
#2
of 438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#719
of 272,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Protein & Cell
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,074 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,057 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.