↓ Skip to main content

Genome re-sequencing suggested a weedy rice origin from domesticated indica-japonica hybridization: a case study from southern China

Overview of attention for article published in Planta, September 2014
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
Genome re-sequencing suggested a weedy rice origin from domesticated indica-japonica hybridization: a case study from southern China
Published in
Planta, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00425-014-2159-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jie Qiu, Jinwen Zhu, Fei Fu, Chu-Yu Ye, Weidi Wang, Linfeng Mao, Zhangxiang Lin, Li Chen, Haiqiang Zhang, Longbiao Guo, Shen Qiang, Yongliang Lu, Longjiang Fan

Abstract

Whole-genome re-sequencing of weedy rice from southern China reveals that weedy rice can originate from hybridization of domesticated indica and japonica rice. Weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea Rosh.), which harbors phenotypes of both wild and domesticated rice, has become one of the most notorious weeds in rice fields worldwide. While its formation is poorly understood, massive amounts of rice genomic data may provide new insights into this issue. In this study, we determined genomes of three weedy rice samples from the lower Yangtze region, China, and investigated their phylogenetics, population structure and chromosomal admixture patterns. The phylogenetic tree and principle component analysis based on 46,005 SNPs with 126 other Oryza accessions suggested that the three weedy rice accessions were intermediate between japonica and indica rice. An ancestry inference study further demonstrated that weedy rice had two dominant genomic components (temperate japonica and indica). This strongly suggests that weedy rice originated from indica-japonica hybridization. Furthermore, 22,443 novel fixed single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in the weedy genomes and could have been generated after indica-japonica hybridization for environmental adaptation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 38%
Student > Master 5 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 76%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Unspecified 1 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2014.
All research outputs
#10,833,599
of 12,221,136 outputs
Outputs from Planta
#1,549
of 1,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,293
of 211,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Planta
#17
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,785 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,375 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.