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Exercise-Related Transient Abdominal Pain (ETAP)

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
47 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
video
4 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
Title
Exercise-Related Transient Abdominal Pain (ETAP)
Published in
Sports Medicine, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0245-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Darren Morton, Robin Callister

Abstract

Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), commonly referred to as 'stitch', is an ailment well known in many sporting activities. It is especially prevalent in activities that involve repetitive torso movement with the torso in an extended position, such as running and horse riding. Approximately 70 % of runners report experiencing the pain in the past year and in a single running event approximately one in five participants can be expected to suffer the condition. ETAP is a localized pain that is most common in the lateral aspects of the mid abdomen along the costal border, although it may occur in any region of the abdomen. It may also be related to shoulder tip pain, which is the referred site from tissue innervated by the phrenic nerve. ETAP tends to be sharp or stabbing when severe, and cramping, aching, or pulling when less intense. The condition is exacerbated by the postprandial state, with hypertonic beverages being particularly provocative. ETAP is most common in the young but is unrelated to sex or body type. Well trained athletes are not immune from the condition, although they may experience it less frequently. Several theories have been presented to explain the mechanism responsible for the pain, including ischemia of the diaphragm; stress on the supportive visceral ligaments that attach the abdominal organs to the diaphragm; gastrointestinal ischemia or distension; cramping of the abdominal musculature; ischemic pain resulting from compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament; aggravation of the spinal nerves; and irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Of these theories, irritation of the parietal peritoneum best explains the features of ETAP; however, further investigations are required. Strategies for managing the pain are largely anecdotal, especially given that its etiology remains to be fully elucidated. Commonly purported prevention strategies include avoiding large volumes of food and beverages for at least 2 hours prior to exercise, especially hypertonic compounds; improving posture, especially in the thoracic region; and supporting the abdominal organs by improving core strength or wearing a supportive broad belt. Techniques for gaining relief from the pain during an episode are equivocal. This article presents a contemporary understanding of ETAP, which historically has received little research attention but over the past 15 years has been more carefully studied.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
Italy 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 90 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Postgraduate 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Other 11 11%
Other 35 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 48%
Unspecified 16 16%
Sports and Recreations 15 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Other 6 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2019.
All research outputs
#157,269
of 13,595,581 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#167
of 2,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,601
of 200,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#2
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,595,581 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,207 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,247 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.