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Running for time: circadian rhythms and melanoma

Overview of attention for article published in Tumor Biology, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Running for time: circadian rhythms and melanoma
Published in
Tumor Biology, April 2014
DOI 10.1007/s13277-014-1904-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elitza P. Markova-Car, Davor Jurišić, Nataša Ilić, Sandra Kraljević Pavelić

Abstract

Circadian timing system includes an input pathway transmitting environmental signals to a core oscillator that generates circadian signals responsible for the peripheral physiological or behavioural events. Circadian 24-h rhythms regulate diverse physiologic processes. Deregulation of these rhythms is associated with a number of pathogenic conditions including depression, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer. Melanoma is a less common type of skin cancer yet more aggressive often with a lethal ending. However, little is known about circadian control in melanoma and exact functional associations between core clock genes and development of melanoma skin cancer. This paper, therefore, comprehensively analyses current literature data on the involvement of circadian clock components in melanoma development. In particular, the role of circadian rhythm deregulation is discussed in the context of DNA repair mechanisms and influence of UV radiation and artificial light exposure on cancer development. The role of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme and impact of melatonin, as a major output factor of circadian rhythm, and its protective role in melanoma are discussed in details. We hypothesise that further understanding of clock genes' involvement and circadian regulation might foster discoveries in the field of melanoma diagnostics and treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
Poland 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Turkey 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
Unknown 30 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 25%
Student > Master 5 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 14%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 28%
Unspecified 8 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 19%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2017.
All research outputs
#2,653,410
of 11,527,700 outputs
Outputs from Tumor Biology
#142
of 2,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,028
of 194,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tumor Biology
#5
of 120 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,527,700 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,309 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 120 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.