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Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, July 2014
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1 tweeter

Citations

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36 Dimensions

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110 Mendeley
Title
Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00221-014-4024-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian Cipriani, Jacob L. Segil, Francesco Clemente, Richard F. ff. Weir, Benoni Edin

Abstract

Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 105 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 34%
Researcher 20 18%
Student > Master 11 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Unspecified 7 6%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 61 55%
Unspecified 8 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 7%
Computer Science 8 7%
Neuroscience 6 5%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 7 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2014.
All research outputs
#7,636,500
of 12,219,322 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,277
of 2,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,052
of 209,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#32
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,140 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.