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Child dermoid cyst mimicking a craniopharyngioma: the benefit of MRI T2-weighted diffusion sequence

Overview of attention for article published in Child's Nervous System, September 2017
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Title
Child dermoid cyst mimicking a craniopharyngioma: the benefit of MRI T2-weighted diffusion sequence
Published in
Child's Nervous System, September 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00381-017-3602-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aymeric Amelot, Alin Borha, Raphael Calmon, Patrick Barbet, Stephanie Puget

Abstract

Brain dermoid cysts are very rare lesions. Although benign, these cysts may be associated with devastating complications due to mass effect or meningitis. The discovery of completely asymptomatic dermoid cysts in the pediatric population is exceedingly rare. Despite the advances in imaging modalities, it sometimes remains difficult to exclude the differential diagnosis of craniopharyngioma. We describe a 12-year-old boy addressed for suspicion of craniopharyngioma diagnosed by decreased visual acuity, bitemporal hemianopia and a CT scan showing a large hypodense suprasellar lesion with intralesional calcifications. Despite the unusual localization and size of this lesion, the absence of dermal sinus commonly found, and before visualizing a hyperintense mass on MRI-diffusion, the diagnosis of craniopharyngioma was ruled out in favor of a dermoid cyst. Radical excision was performed. In the suprasellar area, craniopharyngioma and dermoid cyst may have very similar radiological aspects: low density masses on CT scan and a hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI sequences with a variable signal on T2-weighted sequences. Hitherto, only two cases in literature have described suprasellar dermoid cyst. Their initial diagnosis was facilitated by the presence of a dermal sinus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 29%
Professor 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 43%
Mathematics 1 14%
Neuroscience 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Unknown 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,426,981
of 11,794,580 outputs
Outputs from Child's Nervous System
#649
of 1,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,429
of 267,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child's Nervous System
#35
of 76 outputs
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