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Whose turn is it anyway? The moderating role of response-execution certainty on the joint Simon effect

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Research, August 2017
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Title
Whose turn is it anyway? The moderating role of response-execution certainty on the joint Simon effect
Published in
Psychological Research, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00426-017-0901-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

April Karlinsky, Melanie Y. Lam, Romeo Chua, Nicola J. Hodges

Abstract

When a two-choice "Simon task" is distributed between two people, performance in the shared go/no-go task resembles performance in the whole task alone. This finding has been described as the joint Simon effect (JSE). Unlike the individual go/no-go task, not only is the typical joint Simon task shared with another person, but also the imperative stimuli dictate whose turn it is to respond. Therefore, in the current study, we asked whether removing the agent discrimination component of the joint Simon task influences co-representation. Participants performed the typical joint Simon task, which was compared to two turn-taking versions of the task. For these turn-taking tasks, pairs predictably alternated turns on consecutive trials, with their respective imperative stimulus presented either on 100% of their turns (fully predictable group) or on 83% of their turns (response-uncertainty group, 17% no-go catch trials). The JSE was absent in the fully predictable, turn-taking task, but emerged similarly under the response-uncertainty condition and the typical joint Simon task condition where there is both turn and response-execution-related uncertainty. These results demonstrate that conflict related to agent discrimination is likely not a critical factor driving the JSE, whereas conflict surrounding the need to execute a response (and hence the degree of preparation) appears fundamental to co-representation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 29%
Student > Master 2 29%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 71%
Sports and Recreations 1 14%
Neuroscience 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2017.
All research outputs
#10,455,975
of 11,794,580 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Research
#459
of 559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#226,166
of 267,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Research
#7
of 22 outputs
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