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Cancer risk in Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Effects of oral contraceptive use and parental origin of mutation

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
Title
Cancer risk in Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Effects of oral contraceptive use and parental origin of mutation
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10549-011-1509-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shiri Bernholtz, Yael Laitman, Bella Kaufman, Shani Paluch Shimon, Eitan Friedman

Abstract

BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations substantially increase breast and ovarian cancer risk, yet penetrance is incomplete. The effects of oral contraceptives (OC) on breast cancer risk in mutation carriers are unclear, and the putative effect of parental origin of mutation on cancer risk has not been reported. Data on OC use and parental origin of the mutation were obtained at counseling from 888 BRCA1 (n = 638) or BRCA2 (n = 250) Jewish Israeli mutation carriers who were counseled and genotyped in a single medical center. Overall, 403 (45.4%) of participants had breast cancer (age at diagnosis 49.65 ± 12.2 years), 112 (12.6%) ovarian cancer (age at diagnosis 56.8 ± 10.8 years) and the rest (n = 373-42%) were asymptomatic carriers (age at counseling 40.7 ± 10.6 years). Of study participants, 472 (53.15%) ever used OC, and 298 used OC for at least 5 years. In 129 the mutation originated on the paternal side as judged by direct testing or obligate carriership and in 460 the mutation was maternally inherited. Multivariate logistic regression analysis, and stratifying for birth year, age at menarche, breast feeding, and number of births, showed that ever use of OC (Hazards Ratio-HR = 1.84 95% CI 1.465-2.314, P = 0.001) and paternal compared with maternal origin of mutation (OR = 1.55 95% CI 1.14-2.12, P = 0.006) were significantly associated with breast cancer and an earlier age at breast cancer diagnosis. The authors conclude that OC use and paternal origin of mutation affect breast cancer penetrance in Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 33%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Lecturer 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 50%
Unspecified 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2012.
All research outputs
#1,618,491
of 12,334,049 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#337
of 3,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,871
of 93,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#7
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,334,049 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,102 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,232 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.