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Consumption of sweet foods and breast cancer risk: a case–control study of women on Long Island, New York

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Causes and Control, April 2009
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31 Mendeley
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Title
Consumption of sweet foods and breast cancer risk: a case–control study of women on Long Island, New York
Published in
Cancer Causes and Control, April 2009
DOI 10.1007/s10552-009-9343-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick T. Bradshaw, Sharon K. Sagiv, Geoffrey C. Kabat, Jessie A. Satia, Julie A. Britton, Susan L. Teitelbaum, Alfred I. Neugut, Marilie D. Gammon

Abstract

Several epidemiologic studies have reported a positive association between breast cancer risk and high intake of sweets, which may be due to an insulin-related mechanism. We investigated this association in a population-based case-control study of 1,434 cases and 1,440 controls from Long Island, NY. Shortly after diagnosis, subjects were interviewed in-person to assess potential breast cancer risk factors, and self-completed a modified Block food frequency questionnaire, which included 11 items pertaining to consumption of sweets (sweet beverages, added sugars, and various desserts) in the previous year. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we estimated the association between consumption of sweets and breast cancer. Consumption of a food grouping that included dessert foods, sweet beverages, and added sugars was positively associated with breast cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing the highest to the lowest quartile: 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.61]. The OR was slightly higher when only dessert foods were considered (OR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.23-1.96). The association with desserts was stronger among pre-menopausal women (OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 1.32-3.04) than post-menopausal women (OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.07-1.83), although the interaction with menopause was not statistically significant. Our study indicates that frequent consumption of sweets, particularly desserts, may be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. These results are consistent with other studies that implicate insulin-related factors in breast carcinogenesis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Researcher 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Other 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 26%
Unspecified 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2014.
All research outputs
#3,279,904
of 4,097,429 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Causes and Control
#572
of 732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,704
of 102,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Causes and Control
#16
of 22 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 732 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.