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Phenological differences among selected residents and long-distance migrant bird species in central Europe

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Biometeorology, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

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blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
Title
Phenological differences among selected residents and long-distance migrant bird species in central Europe
Published in
International Journal of Biometeorology, May 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00484-013-0661-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lenka Bartošová, Miroslav Trnka, Zdeněk Bauer, Martin Možný, Petr Štěpánek, Zdeněk Žalud

Abstract

The phenological responses to climate of residents and migrants (short- and long-distance) differ. Although few previous studies have focussed on this topic, the agree that changes in phenology are more apparent for residents than for long-distance migrants. We analysed the breeding times of two selected residents (Sitta europaea, Parus major) and one long-distance migrant (Ficedula albicollis) from 1961 to 2007 in central Europe. The timing of the phenophases of all three bird species showed a significant advance to earlier times. Nevertheless, the most marked shift was observed for the long-distance migrant (1.9 days per decade on average in mean laying date with linearity at the 99.9 % confidence level). In contrast, the shifts shown by the residents were smaller (1.6 days for S. europaea and 1.5 days for P. major also on average in mean laying date for both, with linearity at the 95 % confidence level). Spearman rank correlation coefficients calculated for pairs of phenophases of given bird species in 20-year subsamples (e.g. 1961-1980, 1962-1981) showed higher phenological separation between the residents and the migrant. This separation is most apparent after the 1980s. Thus, our results indicate that the interconnections between the studied phenological stages of the three bird species are becoming weaker.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 31%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 25%
Professor 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Researcher 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 69%
Environmental Science 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,787,066
of 12,223,436 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Biometeorology
#233
of 752 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,009
of 201,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Biometeorology
#7
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,223,436 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 752 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,479 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.