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Transitioning to Minimal Footwear: a Systematic Review of Methods and Future Clinical Recommendations

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine - Open, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 476)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
89 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
191 Mendeley
Title
Transitioning to Minimal Footwear: a Systematic Review of Methods and Future Clinical Recommendations
Published in
Sports Medicine - Open, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40798-017-0096-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joe P. Warne, Allison H. Gruber

Abstract

Recent interest in barefoot running has led to the development of minimalist running shoes that are popular in distance runners. A careful transition to these shoes has been suggested and examined in the literature. However, no guidelines based on systematic evidence have been presented. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine the methods employed in the literature to transition to minimal footwear (MFW), as well as the outcomes to these studies in distance runners. In addition, MFW transition guidelines for future clinical practice will be presented based on observations from this review. A systematic database search was employed using PubMed online as the primary database. Twenty papers were included in the final review. All studies implemented a prospective transition design to MFW with a detail of this transition provided, which increased MFW exposure up to an average of 60% (30-100%) at completion. Only 8/20 studies included injury prevention exercises, and 9/20 included gait retraining. The main outcomes of this transition included limited positive evidence of transitioning into MFW for running economy (n = 4 studies) and muscle development (n = 5). The injury incidence comparing running during the MFW transition (17.9 injuries per 100 participants) to matched participants in conventional running shoes (13.4 injuries per 100) appears equivocal (p = 0.219; effect size phi (φ) = 0.06 [very small]). Finally, several important recommendations for clinical practice and future research have been presented. It is hoped that this paper will present important first steps in unifying the process of transitioning to MFW, both for academic and clinical use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 191 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 191 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 17%
Student > Bachelor 31 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 8%
Other 14 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 40 21%
Unknown 45 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 54 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 14%
Engineering 5 3%
Design 3 2%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 50 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 59. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2023.
All research outputs
#611,907
of 22,958,253 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine - Open
#48
of 476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,270
of 315,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine - Open
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,958,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,977 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.