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Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study
Published in
International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, September 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11548-017-1668-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caecilia Charbonnier, Alexandre Lädermann, Bart Kevelham, Sylvain Chagué, Pierre Hoffmeyer, Nicolas Holzer

Abstract

Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 27%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 24%
Sports and Recreations 4 10%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2018.
All research outputs
#6,818,702
of 13,420,095 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery
#143
of 374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,661
of 225,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery
#2
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,420,095 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 374 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,616 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 8 of them.