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Chronobiological Effects on Obesity

Overview of attention for article published in Current Obesity Reports, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 114)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Chronobiological Effects on Obesity
Published in
Current Obesity Reports, February 2012
DOI 10.1007/s13679-011-0005-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Molly S. Bray, Martin E. Young

Abstract

The development of obesity is the consequence of a multitude of complex interactions between both genetic and environmental factors. It has been suggested that the dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity over the past 30 years has been the result of environmental changes that have enabled the full realization of genetic susceptibility present in the population. Among the many environmental alterations that have occurred in our recent history is the ever-increasing dyssynchrony between natural cycles of light/dark and altered patterns of sleep/wake and eating behavior associated with our "24-hour" lifestyle. An extensive research literature has established clear links between increased risk for obesity and both sleep deprivation and shift work, and our understanding of the consequences of such dyssynchrony at the molecular level is beginning to emerge. Studies linking alterations in cellular circadian clocks to metabolic dysfunction point to the increasing importance of chronobiology in obesity etiology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2014.
All research outputs
#1,782,869
of 4,508,612 outputs
Outputs from Current Obesity Reports
#48
of 114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,547
of 109,651 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Obesity Reports
#2
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,508,612 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 114 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 109,651 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.