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Clinical significance of epithelial‐mesenchymal transition

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Medicine, July 2014
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2 X users

Citations

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181 Mendeley
Title
Clinical significance of epithelial‐mesenchymal transition
Published in
Clinical and Translational Medicine, July 2014
DOI 10.1186/2001-1326-3-17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Konrad Steinestel, Stefan Eder, Andres Jan Schrader, Julie Steinestel

Abstract

The concept of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process where cells change their epithelial towards a mesenchymal phenotype, has gained overwhelming attention especially in the cancer research community. Thousands of scientific reports investigated changes in gene, mRNA and protein expression compatible with EMT and their possible correlation with tumor invasion, metastatic spread or patient prognosis; however, up to now, a proof of clinical significance of the concept is still missing. This review, with a main focus on the role of EMT in tumors, will summarize the basic molecular events underlying EMT including the signaling pathways capable of its induction as well as changes in EMT-associated protein expression and will very briefly touch the role of microRNAs in EMT. We then outline protein markers that are used most frequently for the assessment of EMT in research and diagnostic evaluation of tumor specimens and depict the link between EMT, a cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype and resistance to conventional antineoplastic therapies. Furthermore, we evaluate a possible correlation between EMT marker expression and patient prognosis as well as current therapeutic concepts targeting the EMT process to slow down or prevent metastatic spread of malignant tumors.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 181 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 175 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 46 25%
Researcher 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Student > Master 18 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Other 35 19%
Unknown 24 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 45 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 41 23%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 31 17%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2014.
All research outputs
#17,285,036
of 25,371,288 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Medicine
#571
of 1,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,690
of 242,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Medicine
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,371,288 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,060 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,138 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.