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Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood cells declines with age and is associated with general health among elderly

Overview of attention for article published in Human Genetics, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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109 Dimensions

Readers on

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102 Mendeley
Title
Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood cells declines with age and is associated with general health among elderly
Published in
Human Genetics, June 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00439-014-1458-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonas Mengel-From, Mikael Thinggaard, Christine Dalgård, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Kaare Christensen, Lene Christiansen

Abstract

The role of the mitochondria in disease, general health and aging has drawn much attention over the years. Several attempts have been made to describe how the numbers of mitochondria correlate with age, although with inconclusive results. In this study, the relative quantity of mitochondrial DNA compared to nuclear DNA, i.e. the mitochondrial DNA copy number, was measured by PCR technology and used as a proxy for the content of mitochondria copies. In 1,067 Danish twins and singletons (18-93 years of age), with the majority being elderly individuals, the estimated mean mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood cells was similar for those 18-48 years of age [mean relative mtDNA content: 61.0; 95 % CI (52.1; 69.9)], but declined by -0.54 mtDNA 95 % CI (-0.63; -0.45) every year for those older than approximately 50 years of age. However, the longitudinal, yearly decline within an individual was more than twice as steep as observed in the cross-sectional analysis [decline of mtDNA content: -1.27; 95 % CI (-1.71; -0.82)]. Subjects with low mitochondrial DNA copy number had poorer outcomes in terms of cognitive performance, physical strength, self-rated health, and higher all-cause mortality than subjects with high mitochondrial DNA copy number, also when age was controlled for. The copy number mortality association can contribute to the smaller decline in a cross-sectional sample of the population compared to the individual, longitudinal decline. This study suggests that high mitochondrial DNA copy number in blood is associated with better health and survival among elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Denmark 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 94 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 29%
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Master 19 19%
Unspecified 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 13 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 27%
Unspecified 25 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 15%
Sports and Recreations 4 4%
Other 8 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2015.
All research outputs
#763,880
of 12,215,443 outputs
Outputs from Human Genetics
#79
of 2,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,361
of 202,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Genetics
#3
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,215,443 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,462 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.