↓ Skip to main content

Bleomycin-induced γH2AX foci map preferentially to replicating domains in CHO9 interphase nuclei

Overview of attention for article published in Chromosome Research, July 2014
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
Title
Bleomycin-induced γH2AX foci map preferentially to replicating domains in CHO9 interphase nuclei
Published in
Chromosome Research, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10577-014-9433-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pablo Liddle, Laura Lafon-Hughes, María Vittoria Di Tomaso, Ana Laura Reyes-Ábalos, Jorge Jara, Mauricio Cerda, Steffen Härtel, Gustavo A. Folle

Abstract

Exposure to DNA damaging agents triggers phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX (generating γH2AX) in large chromatin regions flanking DNA lesions, allowing their immunodetection as nuclear foci. Even though a predominance of γH2AX foci in euchromatin has been postulated, foci positioning when DNA insult occurs in replicating eu- or heterochromatin regions has not been extensively explored. Labeling of interphase nuclei with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) pulses has revealed that DNA replication is temporarily and spatially regulated: euchromatin replicates in early S (ES) and heterochromatin along mid and late S (MS/LS) phases. In order to map DNA damage with respect to replicating domains, the distribution of γH2AX foci induced by the radiomimetic agent bleomycin was analyzed in CHO9 interphase nuclei by delineating euchromatic (H3K4me3+) and replicating (EdU+) regions. Quantification of overlapping pixels and 3D inter-object overlap in binary masks revealed colocalization between γH2AX foci and EdU +  domains both in ES and MS/LS nuclei, indicating that primary damage distribution is modulated by DNA synthesis. Further, we verified that EdU incorporation by itself did not influence BLEO-induced γH2AX nuclear patterns. Our results also revealed a repeated localization of γH2AX foci in replicating/nonreplicating interfaces which could reflect short-range chromatin migration following DNA insult.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 24%
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Bachelor 4 24%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 12%
Other 2 12%
Other 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 65%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 24%
Unspecified 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2014.
All research outputs
#10,937,009
of 12,340,498 outputs
Outputs from Chromosome Research
#311
of 363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,118
of 200,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chromosome Research
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,340,498 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 363 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.