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Characterization of brain tumours with spin–spin relaxation: pilot case study reveals unique T 2 distribution profiles of glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma and meningioma

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurology, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Characterization of brain tumours with spin–spin relaxation: pilot case study reveals unique T 2 distribution profiles of glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma and meningioma
Published in
Journal of Neurology, September 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00415-017-8609-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cornelia Laule, Thorarin A. Bjarnason, Irene M. Vavasour, Anthony L. Traboulsee, G. R. Wayne Moore, David K. B. Li, Alex L. MacKay

Abstract

Prolonged spin-spin relaxation times in tumour tissue have been observed since some of the earliest nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of the brain. Over the last three decades, numerous studies have sought to characterize tumour morphology and malignancy using quantitative assessment of T 2 relaxation times, although attempts to categorize and differentiate tumours have had limited success. However, previous work must be interpreted with caution as relaxation data were typically acquired using a variety of multiple echo sequences with a range of echoes and T 2 decay curves and were frequently fit with monoexponential analysis. We defined the distribution of T 2 components in three different human brain tumours (glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma, meningioma) using a multi-echo sequence with a greater number of echoes and a longer acquisition window than previously used (48 echoes, data collection out to 1120 ms) with no a priori assumptions about the number of exponential components contributing to the T 2 decay. T 2 relaxation times were increased in tumour tissue and each tumour showed a distinct T 2 distribution profile. Tumours have complex and unique compartmentalization characteristics. Quantitative assessment of T 2 relaxation in brain cancer may be useful in evaluating different grades of brain tumours on the basis of their T 2 distribution profile, and has the potential to be a non-invasive diagnostic tool which may also be useful in monitoring therapy. Further study with a larger sample size and varying grades of tumours is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Librarian 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 2 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Engineering 2 18%
Physics and Astronomy 1 9%
Unknown 4 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,445,421
of 12,009,062 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurology
#1,252
of 2,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,928
of 266,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurology
#15
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,009,062 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,256 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,074 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.