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Chronic inflammatory arthritis prevalence estimates for children and adolescents in three Canadian provinces

Overview of attention for article published in Rheumatology International, July 2014
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Title
Chronic inflammatory arthritis prevalence estimates for children and adolescents in three Canadian provinces
Published in
Rheumatology International, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00296-014-3085-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natalie Jane Shiff, Lisa M. Lix, Kiem Oen, Lawrence Joseph, Ciaran Duffy, Elizabeth Stringer, Lori B. Tucker, Lawrence W. Svenson, Patrick Belisle, Sasha Bernatsky

Abstract

There is a paucity of published population-based estimates of the prevalence of chronic inflammatory arthritis in the pediatric population. We used administrative health data to estimate the prevalence of chronic inflammatory arthritis in individuals ≤18 years in three Canadian provinces: Quebec, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. Cases aged ≤18 years were identified by meeting any one of the following criteria: (a) ≥1 hospital discharge abstract with an ICD-9 code of 714 or ICD-10-CA codes of M05, M06 or M08, or (b) ≥2 ICD-9 714 billing codes ≥8 weeks apart, but within 2 years, or (c) ≥1 ICD-9 714 billing code by a rheumatologist. Crude prevalence estimates per 10,000 population were estimated with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Prevalence estimates were 11.7 per 10,000 individuals ≤18 years of age in Manitoba, 9.8 per 10,000 in Saskatchewan, and 8.0 per 10,000 in Quebec. In pairwise comparisons of rate differences, Manitoba and Saskatchewan had higher estimates than Quebec. Prevalence estimates were higher for females than males, with a difference of 5.9 cases per 10,000 residents (95 % CI 5.1, 6.7). Saskatchewan was the only province with a higher estimate in urban compared to rural residents (5.2, 95 % CI 2.5, 8.0). Variations in provincial estimates may be due to differences in underlying population characteristics. Although these estimates have face validity and are in keeping with the range of previously published pediatric prevalence estimates, studies to establish the empiric validity of case-finding algorithms are needed to advance research in pediatric chronic disease epidemiology.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 21 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 48%
Unspecified 4 17%
Mathematics 3 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2014.
All research outputs
#9,769,845
of 12,226,671 outputs
Outputs from Rheumatology International
#881
of 1,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,466
of 177,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Rheumatology International
#30
of 33 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.