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Overweight and obesity as poor prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer patients

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
Overweight and obesity as poor prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer patients
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, May 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10549-014-2977-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Arce-Salinas, J. L. Aguilar-Ponce, C. Villarreal-Garza, F. U. Lara-Medina, D. Olvera-Caraza, A. Alvarado Miranda, D. Flores-Díaz, A. Mohar

Abstract

Obesity and overweight are established risk factors for the development of breast cancer. They are also associated with poor prognosis for higher risk of disease recurrence and lower overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of overweight and obesity in OS in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This is a retrospective analysis that included 819 patients diagnosed with LABC between January 2004 and December 2008. The patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAT) based on anthracyclines, taxanes, or both, followed by surgery. For comparison, patients were divided into the normal weight (NW) group or the overweight/obesity (OW/OB) group. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 74 %. General characteristics of the patients, including age, tumor size, clinical stage, nuclear grade, hormone receptors, and HER2 expression, were similar between both groups. At a median follow-up of 28 months, we found a statistically significant difference in OS between the two groups, achieving a 91.5 % in NW patients versus 85.9 % in the OW/OB group (P = 0.050). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that obesity was an independent factor for poor prognosis, with a hazard ratio of 1.79 (95 % CI (Confidence Interval) 1.09-2.96; P = 0.022). This is the first Mexican study that confirms the role of OW/OB as a risk factor for poor outcome among patients with LABC. Obesity in our country is a public health problem and requires strong preventive intervention strategies for its control, especially among patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 35 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 29%
Researcher 6 16%
Other 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 50%
Unspecified 6 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2014.
All research outputs
#1,276,022
of 12,334,049 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#234
of 3,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,875
of 198,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#7
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,334,049 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,102 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.