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Gravitational Lensing in Astronomy

Overview of attention for article published in Living Reviews in Relativity, November 1998
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80 Mendeley
Title
Gravitational Lensing in Astronomy
Published in
Living Reviews in Relativity, November 1998
DOI 10.12942/lrr-1998-12
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joachim Wambsganss

Abstract

Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically. Among them were: the possibility of multiple or ring-like images of background sources, the use of lensing as a gravitational telescope on very faint and distant objects, and the possibility of determining Hubble's constant with lensing. It is only relatively recently, (after the discovery of the first doubly imaged quasar in 1979), that gravitational lensing has became an observational science. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics. In addition to multiply-imaged quasars, a number of other aspects of lensing have been discovered: For example, giant luminous arcs, quasar microlensing, Einstein rings, galactic microlensing events, arclets, and weak gravitational lensing. At present, literally hundreds of individual gravitational lens phenomena are known. Although still in its childhood, lensing has established itself as a very useful astrophysical tool with some remarkable successes. It has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, the large scale matter distribution in the universe, mass and mass distribution of galaxy clusters, the physics of quasars, dark matter in galaxy halos, and galaxy structure. Looking at these successes in the recent past we predict an even more luminous future for gravitational lensing. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-1998-12.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 2 3%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Italy 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 72 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 26%
Student > Bachelor 17 21%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Master 7 9%
Professor 4 5%
Other 19 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 71 89%
Unspecified 4 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Mathematics 1 1%
Philosophy 1 1%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,481,247
of 12,352,410 outputs
Outputs from Living Reviews in Relativity
#91
of 100 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,231
of 193,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Living Reviews in Relativity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,410 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 100 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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