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Fetching what the owner prefers? Dogs recognize disgust and happiness in human behaviour

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
Title
Fetching what the owner prefers? Dogs recognize disgust and happiness in human behaviour
Published in
Animal Cognition, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10071-014-0779-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Borbála Turcsán, Flóra Szánthó, Ádám Miklósi, Enikő Kubinyi

Abstract

Research using the two-object choice paradigm showed that dogs prefer the object associated with the happy human emotion. However, they provided rather ambiguous results regarding the negative emotions. We assumed that differences between the dogs' and owners' interest towards the 'negative' object might be responsible for this. In our experiment, dogs observed their owner expressing different emotions towards two uniform plastic bottles. Five dog groups were tested based on the condition they received: (1) happy versus neutral, (2) happy versus disgust, (3) neutral versus disgust and (4-5) neutral vs neutral, as control groups. Contrary to previous studies using free choice paradigm, we used a task-driven approach. After the demonstration, the dogs had to retrieve one object to the owner. The dogs' performance in the two neutral-neutral groups did not differ from the chance level. In contrast, subjects were able to distinguish between the happy and neutral expression of the owner: they both approached and fetched the 'happy' object. In the happy-disgusted and neutral-disgusted groups, the dogs approached the bottles randomly, suggesting that they found the 'disgusting' and 'neutral' objects equally attractive. Nevertheless, the dogs preferentially retrieved the object marked with the relatively more positive emotion (happy or neutral) to the owner in both conditions. Our results demonstrate that dogs are able to recognize which is the more positive among two emotions, and in a fetching task situation, they override their own interest in the 'disgusting' object and retrieve what the owner prefers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Hungary 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 83 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 22%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Student > Master 12 13%
Researcher 9 10%
Other 6 7%
Other 18 20%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 31%
Psychology 26 29%
Computer Science 4 4%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 20 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2015.
All research outputs
#1,339,533
of 12,222,940 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#287
of 902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,067
of 198,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#11
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,341 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.