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Interculturalism in the post-multicultural debate: a defence

Overview of attention for article published in Comparative Migration Studies, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 128)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
Title
Interculturalism in the post-multicultural debate: a defence
Published in
Comparative Migration Studies, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40878-017-0057-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ricard Zapata-Barrero

Abstract

The main purpose of this article is to formulate a defence of the emerging intercultural policy paradigm for the benefit of those who are still somewhat reluctant to accept its proper place within the current migration-related diversity policy debate. My defence will take two main lines of argumentation: Firstly, I will state that the increasing intensity of the intercultural policy paradigm must be placed in the present-day post-multicultural period, which recognizes the strengths ​​of the multicultural policy paradigm but also the limits to its process for recognizing differences. The role played by the emerging national civic policy paradigm (a renovated version of assimilation), prioritizing duties before rights, will also be considered crucial to better contextualize interculturalism. Secondly, I will try to identify the main distinctive features of interculturalism, which legitimize its proper place within the diversity debate today. Without rejecting rights-based and duties-based policy approaches, interculturalism places more emphasis on a contacts-based policy approach, aimed at fostering communication and relationships among people from different backgrounds, including national citizens. This approach focuses on common bonds rather than differences. It also views diversity as an advantage and a resource, and centres its policy goals on community cohesion and reframing a common public culture that places diversity within rather than outside the so-called Unity. In reviewing the current literature and the origins of the intercultural policy paradigm, I restate its contribution towards resolving current trends in transnationalism, changing identities, superdiversity and the rise of populist anti-immigrant parties. These are issues the old multicultural project has struggled to deal with, which has provoked the current disillusionment. Lastly, I will propose a research avenue to further consolidate interculturalism as a distinctive and legitimate policy approach.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 106 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 15%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Lecturer 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 26 25%
Unknown 25 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 43 41%
Arts and Humanities 14 13%
Philosophy 4 4%
Linguistics 4 4%
Unspecified 3 3%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 27 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,462,019
of 14,142,900 outputs
Outputs from Comparative Migration Studies
#30
of 128 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,719
of 269,159 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Comparative Migration Studies
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,142,900 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 128 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,159 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them