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Multivitamin restriction increases adiposity and disrupts glucose homeostasis in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Genes & Nutrition, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 315)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters
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14 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
Multivitamin restriction increases adiposity and disrupts glucose homeostasis in mice
Published in
Genes & Nutrition, May 2014
DOI 10.1007/s12263-014-0410-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nisserine Ben Amara, Julie Marcotorchino, Franck Tourniaire, Julien Astier, Marie-Josèphe Amiot, Patrice Darmon, Jean-François Landrier

Abstract

A strong association between obesity and low plasma concentrations of vitamins has been widely reported; however, the causality of this relationship is still not established. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of a multivitamin restriction diet (MRD) on body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis in mice. The mice were given a standard diet or a diet containing 50 % of the recommended vitamin intake (MRD) for 12 weeks. At the end of the experiment, total body weight was 6 % higher in MRD animals than in the control group, and the adiposity of the MRD animals more than doubled. The HOMA-IR index of the MRD animals was significantly increased. The adipose tissue of MRD animals had lower expression of mRNA encoding adiponectin and Pnpla2 (47 and 32 %, respectively) and 43 % higher leptin mRNA levels. In the liver, the mRNA levels of Pparα and Pgc1α were reduced (29 and 69 %, respectively) in MRD mice. Finally, the level of β-hydroxybutyrate, a ketonic body reflecting fatty acid oxidation, was decreased by 45 % in MRD mice. Our results suggest that MRD promotes adiposity, possibly by decreasing adipose tissue lipolysis and hepatic β-oxidation. These results could highlight a possible role of vitamin deficiency in the etiology of obesity and associated disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 13%
Netherlands 1 13%
Unknown 6 75%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 38%
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Professor 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%
Chemistry 1 13%
Unspecified 1 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2016.
All research outputs
#834,737
of 12,416,255 outputs
Outputs from Genes & Nutrition
#22
of 315 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,645
of 190,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genes & Nutrition
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,416,255 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 315 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them