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Effect of body size and gender in overarm throwing performance

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
Title
Effect of body size and gender in overarm throwing performance
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2003
DOI 10.1007/s00421-003-1019-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roland van den Tillaar, Gertjan Ettema

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between maximum isometric strength, anthropometry and maximum velocity in overarm throwing for male and female experienced handball players. Twenty male and 20 female handball players were tested. The mean ball velocity was 23.2 m s(-1) and 19.1 m s(-1) for male and female handball players, respectively. For males and females, similar correlations were found between maximal isometric strength and throwing velocity (men, r=0.43, P=0.056; women, r=0.49, P=0.027). Univariate analysis of variance between isometric strength and throwing velocity for men and women showed no significant effect of gender (F(2,36)=0.116, P=0.89). Body size had a strong positive effect on the throwing performance and isometric strength. Throwing velocity appeared to be affected by gender when size was expressed by mass or height (P<0.001). However, this dependence was completely explained by size differences when expressed as fat-free body mass (FFM). For strength, no gender effect was found at all, i.e. all gender differences were explained by size differences, irrespective on how this was expressed. The finding that strength and velocity show a gender independent relationship strengthens the notion that gender difference is based on difference in muscle bulk. We conclude that FFM, as an approximation for skeletal muscle mass, is the best measure to express body size when related to physical performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
China 1 1%
Qatar 1 1%
Unknown 71 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 22%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Master 11 14%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Other 23 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 34 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 12%
Unspecified 5 7%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2014.
All research outputs
#1,130,408
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#519
of 2,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,504
of 198,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#17
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,771 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,315 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.