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Technological Response of Wild Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to Anthropogenic Change

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Primatology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 732)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Technological Response of Wild Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to Anthropogenic Change
Published in
International Journal of Primatology, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10764-017-9985-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lydia V. Luncz, Magdalena S. Svensson, Michael Haslam, Suchinda Malaivijitnond, Tomos Proffitt, Michael Gumert

Abstract

Anthropogenic disturbances have a detrimental impact on the natural world; the vast expansion of palm oil monocultures is one of the most significant agricultural influences. Primates worldwide consequently have been affected by the loss of their natural ecosystems. Long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascilularis) in Southern Thailand have, however, learned to exploit oil palm nuts using stone tools. Using camera traps, we captured the stone tool behavior of one macaque group in Ao Phang-Nga National Park. Line transects placed throughout an abandoned oil palm plantation confirmed a high abundance of nut cracking sites. Long-tailed macaques previously have been observed using stone tools to harvest shellfish along the coasts of Thailand and Myanmar. The novel nut processing behavior indicates the successful transfer of existing lithic technology to a new food source. Such behavioral plasticity has been suggested to underlie cultural behavior in animals, suggesting that long-tailed macaques have potential to exhibit cultural tendencies. The use of tools to process oil palm nuts across multiple primate species allows direct comparisons between stone tool using nonhuman primates living in anthropogenic environments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 32%
Student > Bachelor 10 24%
Student > Master 6 15%
Professor 4 10%
Researcher 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 12 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 24%
Environmental Science 4 10%
Psychology 3 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 79. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2018.
All research outputs
#231,546
of 14,180,703 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Primatology
#7
of 732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,324
of 268,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Primatology
#1
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,180,703 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 732 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,987 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.