↓ Skip to main content

Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK

Overview of attention for article published in Climatic Change, June 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 4,889)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
160 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
806 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK
Published in
Climatic Change, June 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10584-014-1169-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Scarborough, Paul N. Appleby, Anja Mizdrak, Adam D. M. Briggs, Ruth C. Travis, Kathryn E. Bradbury, Timothy J. Key

Abstract

The production of animal-based foods is associated with higher greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than plant-based foods. The objective of this study was to estimate the difference in dietary GHG emissions between self-selected meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK. Subjects were participants in the EPIC-Oxford cohort study. The diets of 2,041 vegans, 15,751 vegetarians, 8,123 fish-eaters and 29,589 meat-eaters aged 20-79 were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Comparable GHG emissions parameters were developed for the underlying food codes using a dataset of GHG emissions for 94 food commodities in the UK, with a weighting for the global warming potential of each component gas. The average GHG emissions associated with a standard 2,000 kcal diet were estimated for all subjects. ANOVA was used to estimate average dietary GHG emissions by diet group adjusted for sex and age. The age-and-sex-adjusted mean (95 % confidence interval) GHG emissions in kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalents per day (kgCO2e/day) were 7.19 (7.16, 7.22) for high meat-eaters ( > = 100 g/d), 5.63 (5.61, 5.65) for medium meat-eaters (50-99 g/d), 4.67 (4.65, 4.70) for low meat-eaters ( < 50 g/d), 3.91 (3.88, 3.94) for fish-eaters, 3.81 (3.79, 3.83) for vegetarians and 2.89 (2.83, 2.94) for vegans. In conclusion, dietary GHG emissions in self-selected meat-eaters are approximately twice as high as those in vegans. It is likely that reductions in meat consumption would lead to reductions in dietary GHG emissions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 737 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 806 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Finland 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 9 1%
Unknown 774 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 197 24%
Student > Master 189 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 108 13%
Researcher 105 13%
Unspecified 75 9%
Other 132 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 157 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 126 16%
Unspecified 112 14%
Social Sciences 77 10%
Engineering 43 5%
Other 291 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1705. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,235
of 13,771,835 outputs
Outputs from Climatic Change
#1
of 4,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16
of 189,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Climatic Change
#1
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,771,835 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,889 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.