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Psychological characteristics, stressful life events and deliberate self-harm: findings from the Child

Overview of attention for article published in European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, August 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
107 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
Title
Psychological characteristics, stressful life events and deliberate self-harm: findings from the Child & Adolescent Self-harm in Europe (CASE) Study
Published in
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, August 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00787-011-0210-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola Madge, Keith Hawton, Elaine M. McMahon, Paul Corcoran, Diego De Leo, Erik Jan de Wilde, Sandor Fekete, Kees van Heeringen, Mette Ystgaard, Ella Arensman

Abstract

There is evidence to suggest that both psychological characteristics and stressful life events are contributory factors in deliberate self-harm among young people. These links, and the possibility of a dose-response relationship between self-harm and both psychological health and life events, were investigated in the context of a seven-country school-based study. Over 30,000, mainly 15 and 16 year olds, completed anonymous questionnaires at secondary schools in Belgium, England, Hungary, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway and Australia. Pupils were asked to report on thoughts and episodes of self-harm, complete scales on depression and anxiety symptoms, impulsivity and self-esteem and indicate stressful events in their lives. Level and frequency of self-harm was judged according to whether they had thought about harming themselves or reported single or multiple self-harm episodes. Multinomial logistic regression assessed the extent to which psychological characteristics and stressful life events distinguished between adolescents with different self-harm histories. Increased severity of self-harm history was associated with greater depression, anxiety and impulsivity and lower self-esteem and an increased prevalence of all ten life event categories. Female gender, higher impulsivity and experiencing the suicide or self-harm of others, physical or sexual abuse and worries about sexual orientation independently differentiated single-episode self-harmers from adolescents with self-harm thoughts only. Female gender, higher depression, lower self-esteem, experiencing the suicide or self-harm of others, and trouble with the police independently distinguished multiple- from single-episode self-harmers. The findings reinforce the importance of psychological characteristics and stressful life events in adolescent self-harm but nonetheless suggest that some factors are more likely than others to be implicated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 202 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 13%
Researcher 26 13%
Student > Bachelor 25 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 11%
Other 71 34%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 89 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 44 21%
Unspecified 34 16%
Social Sciences 23 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 3%
Other 9 4%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2017.
All research outputs
#724,784
of 11,719,214 outputs
Outputs from European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
#56
of 935 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,725
of 91,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,719,214 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 935 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 91,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.