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CXCL9 ‐ 11 polymorphisms are associated with liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C: a cross‐sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Medicine, July 2017
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Title
CXCL9 ‐ 11 polymorphisms are associated with liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C: a cross‐sectional study
Published in
Clinical and Translational Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40169-017-0156-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

María Ángeles Jiménez‐Sousa, Ana Zaida Gómez‐Moreno, Daniel Pineda‐Tenor, Luz Maria Medrano, Juan José Sánchez‐Ruano, Amanda Fernández‐Rodríguez, Tomas Artaza‐Varasa, José Saura‐Montalban, Sonia Vázquez‐Morón, Pablo Ryan, Salvador Resino

Abstract

CXCL9-11 polymorphisms are related to various infectious diseases, including hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this study, we analyzed the association between CXCL9-11 polymorphisms and liver fibrosis in HCV-infected patients. We performed a cross-sectional study in 389 patients who were genotyped for CXCL9-11 polymorphisms (CXCL9 rs10336, CXCL10 rs3921, and CXCL11 rs4619915) using the Sequenom's MassARRAY platform. The primary outcome variable was the liver stiffness measurement (LSM). We established three cut-offs of LSM: LSM ≥ 7.1 kPa (F ≥ 2-significant fibrosis), LSM ≥ 9.5 kPa (F ≥ 3-advanced fibrosis), and LSM ≥ 12.5 kPa (F4-cirrhosis). Recessive, overdominant and codominant models of inheritance showed significant values, but the overdominant model was the best fitting our data. In this case, CXCL9 rs10336 AG, CXCL10 rs3921 CG and CXCL11 rs4619915 AG were mainly associated with lower values of LSM [(adjusted GMR (aGMR) = 0.85 (p = 0.005), aGMR = 0.84 (p = 0.003), and aGMR = 0.84 (p = 0.003), respectively]. Patients with CXCL9 rs10336 AG genotype had lower odds of significant fibrosis (LSM ≥ 7.1 kPa) [adjusted OR (aOR) = 0.59 (p = 0.016)], advanced fibrosis (LSM ≥ 9.5 kPa) [aOR = 0.54 (p = 0.010)], and cirrhosis (LSM ≥ 12.5 kPa) [aOR = 0.56 (p = 0.043)]. Patients with CXCL10 rs3921 CG or CXCL11 rs4619915 AG genotypes had lower odds of significant fibrosis (LSM ≥ 7.1 kPa) [adjusted OR (aOR) = 0.56 (p = 0.008)], advanced fibrosis (LSM ≥ 9.5 kPa) [aOR = 0.55 (p = 0.013)], and cirrhosis (LSM ≥ 12.5 kPa) [aOR = 0.57 (p = 0.051)]. Additionally, CXCL9-11 polymorphisms were related to lower liver stiffness under a codominant model of inheritance, being the heterozygous genotypes also protective against hepatic fibrosis. In the recessive inheritance model, the CXCL9 rs10336 AA, CXCL10 rs3921 CC and CXCL11 rs4619915 AA were associated with higher LSM values [(adjusted GMR (aGMR) = 1.19 (p = 0.030), aGMR = 1.21 (p = 0.023), and aGMR = 1.21 (p = 0.023), respectively]. Moreover, patients with CXCL9 rs10336 AA genotype had higher odds of significant fibrosis (LSM ≥ 7.1 kPa) [adjusted OR (aOR) = 1.83 (p = 0.044)] and advanced fibrosis (LSM ≥ 9.5 kPa) [aOR = 1.85 (p = 0.045)]. Furthermore, patients with CXCL10 rs3921 CC or CXCL11 rs4619915 AA genotypes had higher odds of advanced fibrosis (LSM ≥ 9.5 kPa) [aOR = 1.89 (p = 0.038)]. CXCL9-11 polymorphisms were related to likelihood of having liver fibrosis in HCV-infected patients. Our data suggest that CXCL9-11 polymorphisms may play a significant role against the progression of CHC and could help prioritize antiviral therapy.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Librarian 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2017.
All research outputs
#12,248,029
of 15,414,285 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Medicine
#166
of 243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,986
of 273,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
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