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Effect of barley supplementation on the fecal microbiota, caecal biochemistry, and key biomarkers of obesity and inflammation in obese db/db mice

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Effect of barley supplementation on the fecal microbiota, caecal biochemistry, and key biomarkers of obesity and inflammation in obese db/db mice
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00394-017-1523-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jose F. Garcia-Mazcorro, David A. Mills, Kevin Murphy, Giuliana Noratto

Abstract

Barley is a low-glycemic index grain that can help diabetic and obese patients. The effect of barley intake depends on the host and the associated gut microbiota. This study investigated the effect of barley intake on the fecal microbiota, caecal biochemistry, and key biomarkers of obesity and inflammation. Obese db/db mice were fed diets with and without barley during 8 weeks; lean mice were used as lean controls. Fecal microbiota was evaluated using 16S marker gene sequencing in a MiSeq instrument; several markers of caecal biochemistry, obesity, and inflammation were also evaluated using standard techniques. Bacterial richness (i.e., Operational Taxonomic Units) and Shannon diversity indexes were similar in all obese mice (with and without barley) and higher compared to lean controls. Barley intake was associated with increased abundances of Prevotella, Lactobacillus, and the fiber-degraders S24-7 (Candidatus Homeothermaceae) compared to both lean and obese controls. The analysis of unweighted UniFrac distances showed a separate clustering of samples for each experimental group, suggesting that consumption of barley contributed to a phylogenetically unique microbiota distinct from both obese and lean controls. Caecal butyrate concentrations were similar in all obese mice, while succinic acid was lower in the barley group compared to obese controls. Barley intake was also associated with lower plasma insulin and resistin levels compared to obese controls. This study shows that barley intake is associated with a different fecal microbiota, caecal biochemistry, and obesity biomarkers in db/db mice that tend to be more similar to lean controls.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 21%
Researcher 5 21%
Unspecified 3 13%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Other 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,497,764
of 11,642,880 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#329
of 1,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,049
of 264,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#11
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,642,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,265 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.