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Reversibility of crumpling on compressed thin sheets

Overview of attention for article published in European Physical Journal E -- Soft Matter, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Reversibility of crumpling on compressed thin sheets
Published in
European Physical Journal E -- Soft Matter, April 2014
DOI 10.1140/epje/i2014-14028-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alain Pocheau, Benoit Roman

Abstract

Compressing thin sheets usually yields the formation of singularities which focus curvature and stretching on points or lines. In particular, following the common experience of crumpled paper where a paper sheet is crushed in a paper ball, one might guess that elastic singularities should be the rule beyond some compression level. In contrast, we show here that, somewhat surprisingly, compressing a sheet between cylinders make singularities spontaneously disappear at large compression. This "stress defocusing" phenomenon is qualitatively explained from scale-invariance and further linked to a criterion based on a balance between stretching and curvature energies on defocused states. This criterion is made quantitative using the scalings relevant to sheet elasticity and compared to experiment. These results are synthesized in a phase diagram completed with plastic transitions and buckling saturation. They provide a renewed vision of elastic singularities as a thermodynamic condensed phase where stress is focused, in competition with a regular diluted phase where stress is defocused. The physical differences between phases is emphasized by determining experimentally the mechanical response when stress is focused or defocused and by recovering the corresponding scaling laws. In this phase diagram, different compression routes may be followed by constraining differently the two principal curvatures of a sheet. As evidenced here, this may provide an efficient way of compressing a sheet that avoids the occurrence of plastic damages by inducing a spontaneous regularization of geometry and stress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 43%
Researcher 2 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 3 43%
Engineering 3 43%
Chemistry 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2014.
All research outputs
#7,779,782
of 13,045,091 outputs
Outputs from European Physical Journal E -- Soft Matter
#247
of 447 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,150
of 188,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Physical Journal E -- Soft Matter
#5
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,045,091 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 447 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.